Washington demo on 25 May confirmed

It's official:

Egyptian-Americans and Supporters of Democracy in Egypt to Protest at Egyptian Embassy in Washington DC
Thursday May 25, 2006.

Demonstrate along with activists in cities worldwide against the Egyptian regime’s quashing of basic freedoms. We demand independence for the Egyptian judiciary and the release of all detained protesters and activists, and protest Washington’s silence on this count. May 25 is the first anniversary of “black Wednesday,” the date of a referendum on cosmetic changes to the Egyptian electoral system. On that day peaceful protesters and journalists were violently attacked and sexually assaulted by police and government thugs.

When?
Thursday, May 25, 2006 from 12 noon to 1 p.m.

Where?
In front of the Egyptian Embassy, 3521 International Court, NW, Washington DC 20008. (Metro: Van Ness/UDC)

Why?
We support Egyptian judges who are fighting for the freedom to uphold the rule of law and honest elections.
We call for the release of Egyptian political activists from jail – 700 of them, of all political and ideological stripes, have been arrested in the last month and treated brutally by Mubarak's security services simply for protesting against the regime and calling for democracy.
We protest Washington's silence towards the repression its closest Arab ally is conducting against peaceful dissent. We believe that the continuation of the status quo is harmful to the long term interests of both the United States and Egypt.
We demonstrate in solidarity with people around the world for the same cause on the same day, in Cairo, New York, London, Paris, Chicago, Seoul, Montreal and Athens.

Who?
The Alliance of Egyptian Americans, DC area student groups, the International Socialist Organization and individual supporters of democracy in Egypt.

Contact:
Dr. Ibrahim M. Hussein
Alliance of Egyptian Americans
(301) 613 7337

Sumita Pahwa
spahwa@jhu.edu
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Issandr El Amrani

Issandr El Amrani is a Cairo-based writer and consultant. His reporting and commentary on the Middle East and North Africa has appeared in The Economist, London Review of Books, Financial Times, The National, The Guardian, Time and other publications. He also publishes one of the longest-running blog in the region, www.arabist.net.