Three years in prison for Emad al-Kabir torturers

I have just received this press release from the Arab Center for the Independence of the Judiciary and the Legal Profession (ACIJLP -- yes, that's a mouthful) saying that the police officers who beat and molested Emad al-Kabir last year. It's good news in an otherwise pretty awful case -- remember that al-Kabir, a bus driver, was sentenced last January to three months of prison for "resisting arrest." We've covered the case a lot as part of the "al-Adly videogate" scandal, when bloggers published several videos of torture in Egyptian police stations.

Historic verdict: defendants jailed for torture of el-Kebeer

The Arab Center for the Independence of the Judiciary and the Legal Profession (ACIJLP) commends the verdict issued today by the Giza Criminal Court against assistant investigating officer Islam Nabih and policeman Reda Fathy, both based at the Boulaq Dakrour police station. The two men were convicted of the torture and sexual assault of Emmad Mohamed Ali, popularly known as Emmad el-Kebeer, and sentenced to three-years imprisonment.

The case was brought by lawyer and ACIJLP director Nasser Amin after a clip circulated on the Internet showing the torture and sexual assault of el-Kebeer. Police investigations were initiated, and culminated in the judgement handed down today.

ACIJLP praises the verdict issued against the two men which reaffirms the integrity of the Egyptian judiciary and its effectiveness in the protection of human rights. The judgement represents a new stage during which the Egyptian judiciary will fight torture.

ACIJLP thus celebrates this verdict and urges the Egyptian legislator and government to take widespread measures in accordance with Egypt’s commitments under the Convention Against Torture and other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment.
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Issandr El Amrani

Issandr El Amrani is a Cairo-based writer and consultant. His reporting and commentary on the Middle East and North Africa has appeared in The Economist, London Review of Books, Financial Times, The National, The Guardian, Time and other publications. He also publishes one of the longest-running blog in the region, www.arabist.net.