The de facto Saudi-Israel alliance

You know something is weird is taking place when you see the following.

And in Ynet:

Op-ed: Israel, Saudi Arabia should form alliance of necessity vis-à-vis Iran’s nuclear threat

Shoula Romano Horing

Finally, Saudi Arabia and Israel have common ground for establishing a temporary strategic alliance, similar to the one that existed during World War II between the Soviet Union and United States against the Nazi regime.

Both countries mistrust President Barack Obama as a reliable ally and fear the prospect of a nuclear Iran.

Despite the major differences in values and a history of enmity, it seems only rational that Saudi Arabia should seek the unthinkable and cooperate with the Jewish state in order to preserve its survival and political independence. Otherwise, the Saudis and other Persian Gulf states will be the first victims of a nuclear Iran, without a capable, strong and reliable ally to come to their aid.

 

From JINSA (US right-wing Jewish Zionist think tank, that is, only slightly right of mainstream):

JINSA Report #1081

April 21, 2011

What the Saudis Understand - and We Don't

Who would have thought that we would find ourselves agreeing with the Saudi approach to events in the Middle East, while thinking our own government needs a "reset"? 

National Security Council Advisor Tom Donilon visited Saudi Arabia and Saudi King Abdullah brought three of his advisors to the meeting: Director of General Intelligence Prince Muqrin bin Abdulaziz; Secretary-General of the National Security Council Prince Bandar bin Sultan; and Saudi Ambassador to the United States Adel Jubeir. David V. Dafinoiu of the Global Intelligence Center describes Muqrin as focused on Iran, Yemen, Libya and al Qaeda; Bandar on foreign military relations other than the United States; and Jubeir having the U.S. portfolio. All, according to the Dafinoiu, are "Hawks and live wires."

That looks about right - Iran, Yemen, Libya and al Qaeda are where the action is; Saudi Arabia is buying military equipment from China as well as the United States; and well, it was an American envoy, so Jubeir was there. Notice what did not appear to be on the agenda - Israel, Israeli occupation, Palestinians or Palestinian independence. 

It all smacks of desperateness, but is telling of something: that the two biggest counter-revolutionary forces in the Middle East, both theocracies of a different kind, are finding their interests allied not only against the third theocracy (of yet another kind) but more generally against the spirit of dignity that is rising in the Middle East. Pox on both of their houses.

[Ali Gharib, whose blog and contributions to Lobelog you should read, alerted me to these pieces.]