Mubarak's letter to court

SCAF head Hussein Tantawy, kissing Hosni Mubarak, 1980s or early 1990sFrom Mubarak’s memo to the court trying him, protests of innocence and the obligatory reference to foreign conspiracy. Sarah El Deeb reports for AP:

“The unjust accusations and the baseless allegations I am facing sadden me. I am not someone who would shed his people’s blood. I have spent my life defending them. Hosni Mubarak is not someone to smear his military honor with ill-gotten wealth,” the published letter said.

He is charged with complicity in the killing of nearly 900 protesters in the uprising that forced him out of office last year. If convicted, Mubarak could face the death penalty by hanging. Five of the former president’s top security officials face the same charges.

“Despite everything, I am totally confident in the fairness and justice of the Egyptian judiciary. I am totally confident in history’s judgment, and totally confident in the great Egyptian people’s judgment — free from the allegations of the tendentious and those seeking to sow sedition, and those receiving foreign funding.”

In the completely schizophrenic mindset of SCAF, the security services and the state media they control, the revolution is both a glorious day and an insidious plot. They like the part that got rid of Gamal Mubarak and his friends, settling a decade-long inner-regime clan war. But they still can’t stand the other, more important, part that wants all the regime gone. That schizophrenia is part and parcel of Mubarakism.