MERIP and POMEPS Egypt specials

Two new publications entirely devoted to Egypt this month:

1. MERIP has a special special issue on Egypt two years after the uprising. It features a particularly nice long essay on accountability for the police in Imbaba from our friend Matt Hall, among many other good articles. Josh Stacher gives this assessment of President Mohammed Morsi:

Mursi’s tenure to date, indeed, reinforces the thesis that Mubarak’s ouster was “half-revolution, half-coup.” An incumbent was ejected and selected cronies -- such as Gamal Mubarak’s neoliberal reformers and ex-Interior Minister Habib al-‘Adli -- were thrown to the wolves. But changes at the top have not translated into structural change; the largest and best-organized opposition force, the Muslim Brothers, has largely been integrated into the ancien regime. The protesters in Tahrir Square and elsewhere are a wild card. But barring a shift in the balance of power between the reconstituted elites and revolutionary forces, the Brother-status quo coalition is poised to dominate Egypt, irrespective of who the president is, whence he hails or what his stated plans for national rebirth may be.

2. POMEPS, the academic organization that is part of Abu Aardvark's sprawling empire, also has a special issue on Egypt, called "The Battle for Egypt's Constitution." Marc Lynch gives the details here. It gathers articles published on Foreign Policy in recent months.