Zar Night in Cairo

For those in Cairo, the Egyptian Center for Culture and Art (Makan) is hosting a Zar music night performed by the Mazaher ensemble. I don't know what Zar music was used for when it first evolved but now adays Zar is known as the way through which some people in the recent past (and very very few people today) used to help get evil spirits out of somebody's soul (usually women suffering from some type of hysteria). At moments like these I wish superstition actually worked, we would have been able to drive the devils out of Gaza and Palestine altogether! Anyway, it sounds like an interesting cultural event and if I was in Cairo i would have attended, so I recommend going there, just one request, if anyone attends please take some pictures and write a couple of paragraphs about it and allow me to post it under your name on this blog. Below is the invitation:
(Zar Music & Songs)  On Wednesday 21 January, 2009 at 9:00 pm Mazaher is an ensemble in which women play a leading role. The musicians of Mazaher , Umm Sameh, Umm Hassan, Nour el Sabah are among the last remaining Zar practitioners in Egypt. The music is inspired by the three different styles musical styles of the Zar tradition practiced in Egypt. One of the African dimensions of Egypt, Zar music unfolds through rich poly-rhythmic drumming: it's songs are distinctly different from other Egyptian music traditions. The music of Mazaher is inspired by the three different styles of Zar music practiced in Egypt-the Egyptian or Upper Egyptian Zar, Abu Gheit Zar and the Sudanese, or African Zar. The ECCA is not researching or documenting the ritualistic aspects of the Zar, rather it focuses documenting and promoting this unique musical legacy. ECCA has gathered together some Zar performers and motivated them to go through lengthy sessions of rehearsing, remembering and recording. Mazaher is the result of these efforts. Doors open at 8:30pm. Tickets: 20 LE  Tea and Karkade are served To rsvp.  E-mail: makan@egyptmusic.org MakAn: 1 (Not 1a) Saad Zaghloul Street, 11461, El Dawaween, Cairo. (on the corner of across Saad Zaghloul and Mansour street)  Tel: 00202 27920878 http://www.egyptmusic.org
 
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